Tea Categories

Two main types of Tea:

  1. Black Tea
  2. Green Tea

There are two types of Black tea processing :

  1. Orthodox
  2. CTC (Crush, Tear, Curl)

Orthodox:

Orthodox or the traditional tea-making begins with "withering" the freshly plucked leaf. Withering is inducing ( with the help of warm air) the leaf to lose about half its moisture in the course of 12 to 18 hours. At the end of this phase of manufacture, the leaf is limp. This limpness helps the next stage of tea-processing known as "rolling" whose object I s dual: to rupture the leaf cells for releasing the enzymes and to twist or curl the leaf. It is made possible by rolling the leaf in a machine for one to two hours as if it is being squeezed between the palms of hands.

If the leaf was not limp, more than normal quantity of watery juice would be squeezed when rolling, resulting in loss of essential solids. Fresh or brittle leaf would not ensure a well-distributed rupturing of the cells while rolling. Moreover, limpness enables the leaf to assume the desirable twist or curl.

By rupturing the leaf cells, rolling sets off, though it does not complete, fermentation. To complete the process, the mass of rolled leaf is preserved in a cool humid atmosphere. The total time taken between the commencement of rolling and achieving optimum fermentation is two to three hours, after which the enzymes must be destroyed. To arrest further fermentation the mass of leaf is exposed to hot air by passing it through a chamber where the air temperature is maintained between 200- 250 degree Fahrenheit. This process which is known as "firing" goes on for half an hour by which time the colour of the leaf turns from bright gold to black. After the "fired" leaf has cooled to ambient temperature, it is ready for grading/sorting.

CTC: :

Orthodox or the traditional tea-making begins with "withering" the freshly plucked leaf. Withering is inducing ( with the help of warm air) the leaf to lose about half its moisture in the course of 12 to 18 hours. At the end of this phase of manufacture, the leaf is limp. This limpness helps the next stage of tea-processing known as "rolling" whose object I s dual: to rupture the leaf cells for releasing the enzymes and to twist or curl the leaf. It is made possible by rolling the leaf in a machine for one to two hours as if it is being squeezed between the palms of hands.

If the leaf was not limp, more than normal quantity of watery juice would be squeezed when rolling, resulting in loss of essential solids. Fresh or brittle leaf would not ensure a well-distributed rupturing of the cells while rolling. Moreover, limpness enables the leaf to assume the desirable twist or curl.

By rupturing the leaf cells, rolling sets off, though it does not complete, fermentation. To complete the process, the mass of rolled leaf is preserved in a cool humid atmosphere. The total time taken between the commencement of rolling and achieving optimum fermentation is two to three hours, after which the enzymes must be destroyed. To arrest further fermentation the mass of leaf is exposed to hot air by passing it through a chamber where the air temperature is maintained between 200- 250 degree Fahrenheit. This process which is known as "firing" goes on for half an hour by which time the colour of the leaf turns from bright gold to black. After the "fired" leaf has cooled to ambient temperature, it is ready for grading/sorting.

We have also installed a Pyramid tea bag machines with pouch for leaf tea and a cold storage system for storage of fruit & flower infusion raw materials. The result is that today Premier's Tea whether in bulk or packet, measures up to International Standards of acceptability, including standards of packaging for niche markets and mass markets. The company is certified against HACCP, Food Safety System Certification 22000:2010, ISO 22000:2005, and the manufacturing units also comply with organic tea standards related to India organic USDA, EU & JAS.